Words in Deep Blue Review

Words in Deep Blue fails in the romance department, but managed to keep me reading through to the emotional end.

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Words in Deep Blue was originally published in Australia in 2016. It was re-released and published to the US in June 2017.

Rachel and Henry were the best of friends until Rachel is forced to move away. The night before she moves, Rachel tucks a letter declaring her love for Henry and places it in the Letter Library, a special section in the bookstore Henry’s family owns. However, Henry never mentions the letter or its contents to Rachel leading to the slow dissolution of their friendship. Jump forward several years and Rachel is moving back to town to get away from the loss of brother, Cal, who drowned several months before. At the behest of her worried family, Rachel ends up taking a job at Henry’s family bookstore. The two end up working side by side, in awkward and mostly tense exchanges towards the possibility of second chances.

Despite this being a YA contemporary romance, I didn’t care for the romance in this book. I liked the book enough to give it 3 stars, but it wasn’t because of the relationship between Rachel and Henry. It just didn’t feel real on both sides. Rachel was in love with Henry for years, but she managed to move on. She dated someone else, she loved that individual, she moved on from Henry. So, its hard for me to believe it was so easy to fall back into love with Henry.

On the flip side, Henry never really loved Rachel beyond that of a best friend. Throughout 90 percent of the book, Henry is devastatingly in love with Amy and has been for years. Despite her poor treatment of him, he always welcomes her back with open arms. In fact, at one point literally right after kissing Rachel, Amy waltz’s into his life and suddenly Henry’s like, “Rachel who?” As a side note, Henry is also just an annoying character, he irritates me beyond belief. When switching to his perspective, its supposed to make me feel for him, but I was just more vexed.

So, with these things in mind, there sudden, magical pairing was hard to swallow at the end of the book. I think the author, Cath Crowley, was trying to accomplish too much in too little space; if she had extended the book and spent more time on the pair, there get-together would have been more believable. It seemed that Crowley, depended heavily on the past interactions of the two, something the reader never sees, so it didn’t help the believability of a romantic relationship. I could have believed a return to best friendship, but not romance.

The reason I rated this book as high as I did, was because of the grief Rachel experiences in this book. Or more realistically, the way grief is experienced by a few characters in the story. Oftentimes when I read about grief or loss I can tell if the author has actually experienced it; sometimes they get really flowery in the description of what its like to lose someone you are close to and it feels fake. This isn’t to say that some people can’t feel that way about death, but that isn’t how I experienced it. So, when I read books that describe grief in that way, I struggle to connect.

I would advise, that for people who haven’t experienced loss the way Rachel has that it may be hard to connect with her decisions particularly in the beginning. Why she chooses to stay silent about her suffering may seem ridiculous, but I promise it makes sense.

Another positive for me, was I loved the parallel storyline that occurred in the Letter Library with Henry’s sister, George. Though I didn’t like her character as I found she had the same irritating qualities as her older brother, the letter exchanges showed the best part of her character. Though it made her seem less obnoxious, it didn’t totally redeem her. Nevertheless, I liked reading the letters between George and her mysterious admirer.

Overall, I would recommend this book to read. Would I reread it? No, but I don’t regret reading it in the first place. I rated it 3/5 stars.

Suspicious Partners Review

Okay, I think this is like my fourth or fifth K-drama that I’ve watched and its definitely cemented as one of my favorites.

Suspicious Partner follows No Ji Wook, a hard-to-do prosecutor and Eun Bong Hee, a judicial trainee. The two meet incidentally on a subway, where Bong Hee falsely accuses Ji Wook of being a pervert who grabbed her butt. The pair meets again later that night after Bong Hee gets into a fight with her boyfriend for cheating on her and Ji Wook overhears and comes to her rescue, as he himself was once cheated upon. Ji Wook and Bong Hee end up sharing a drink (i.e. several drinks) and Bong Hee wakes up in Ji Wooks house the next morning, unable to remember anything. Thoroughly embarrassed, Bong Hee flees the scene and heads to work where she finds out Ji Wook is her mentor and new boss.

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The Scandal of it All Review

I’m a sucker for these kinds of mass paperbacks, but this one let me down a little bit. To be fair The Scandal of it All is the second book in The Rogue Files by Sophie Jordan, but I didn’t realize that until I had already purchased it and cracked it open at home. However, based on the reviews I’ve read from others, it would seem that reading the other novel before The Scandal of it All would have only let me down more.

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The Mindy Project Season Premiere Review

I love The Mindy Project; I remember when I first started watching the show several years ago. I stayed up two nights straight binging the show because it was so good. So, with that love in mind, I decided to postpone putting my Hulu account on hold last week when I found out the new and final season was premiering.

Sadly that might’ve been a mistake. The first five minutes got a few quiet chuckles out of me, but that’s about it.

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The Heirs Review

Come for Lee Min-ho, stay for Kim Woo Bin.

The Heirs is the second K-Drama I have watched and my experience with this one was very different from watching my first, The Legend of the Blue Sea. The two shows share their male lead, Lee Min-ho, but that’s about it. The premise of The Heirs centers around Cha Eun-Sang and Kim Tan. Eun-Sang’s mother is the housekeeper to Kim Tans wealthy family; Eun Sang and Kim Tan meet in America when Eun Sang visits her sister in America to give her money under the belief she is getting married. Eun Sang hopes to stay in the States to find a better life, but finds her sister is not getting married and instead she takes the money and runs, leaving Eun Sang devastated.

Kim Tan watches the heart-wrenching exchange of Eun Sang fighting with her sister and after an unfortunate disaster feels compelled to help her. The two grow close over the next few days, but Eun Sang eventually returns to South Korea and treats her time in America as a dream. Kim Tan, who was exiled to America by his elder, half-brother, Won, decides to return to South Korea a few months after Eun Sang leaves. His return causes great disturbance amongst his family and for Eun Sang, once he realizes she lives in his home. He consistently pursues Eun Sang, causing much strife for her particularly from their classmates at Jeguk High, a high school filled with wealthy and cruel elites.

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That Thing We Call A Heart Review

Overall, a fairly weak story, with unlikeable characters and a shoddy romance. On a positive side, presented an often unseen picture of devout Muslims, who break “from the norm.” 3 out of 5 stars.

To preface my review, I’d never heard of this book or any reviews prior to reading the story so I was going in very blind. I saw it on the new books shelf in the YA section, picked it up and brought it home. I don’t have a long winding prologue for this review, this is all I could muster today, so I’m going to jump into the book review.

That Thing We Call a Heart is by Sheba Karim and was published May of this year. The novel follows Shabnam Qureshi during her last summer at home before college. She is at odds with her best friend, Farah, after Farah decided to wear the Muslim headscarf without consulting Shabnam. With a bleak summer ahead of her because of this estrangement, Shabnam is not excited for the season, until she meets Jamie. After he gets Shabnam a job at his Aunt Marianne’s pie shack, Shabnam beings to fall in love with Jamie, likening their relationship to the rose and the nightingale from classic Urdu poetry. As the summer progresses, begins to reconnect with Farah, but she mistrusts Jamie, which increases tension.

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Legend of the Blue Sea Review

Altogether, I loved Legend of the Blue Sea. The characters were well established and the chemistry between the leads both as their Dynasty and Modern characters was palpable; the pair were well-casted. There were some weak spots, but not enough to damage the story for me. I would rate it 4.8/5 stars. 

 

“Everything is repeating.”

Legend of the Blue Sea has two parallel storylines, one set during the Joseon Era and the other in the modern world. A major theme of the show is history repeating itself and the desperate attempt to keep this from happening. In the Era timeline, the newly appointed townhead, Dam Ryeong, releases a mermaid who was captured by the local innkeeper back into the ocean. Before the mermaid, Se-hwa, swims away, she turns around and reaches her hand to Dam Ryeong, “which he briefly holds.” This connection sets off their intertwined destiny for both storylines.

In the present world, Joon-Jae is a conman, who works with Nam-Doo and Tae-oh. After completing a large con, the three separate on vacation, where Joon-Jae heads to a seaside resort. It is here, where mermaid, Shim-Cheong, is caught up in a tidal wave and washed ashore, and breaks into Joon-Jae’s hotel room. Despite Joon-Jae’s attempt to get rid of Cheong, she refuses to leave his side.

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